July 2015 Carnival of Aces Call for Submissions: Asexual History

It’s now July, and that means a new Carnival of Aces! For those of you not familiar with it, the Carnival of Aces is a recurring blogging event where we write and collect blog posts (or tumblr posts, or linkspams, or videos) on a select topic each month. You can view the masterpost of previous topics here. Last month’s topic was “Mental Health”, and you can view the submissions here. Anyone can write a post – to be featured in the carnival, just post a link to your article here in the comments or shoot me an email at sennkestra@gmail.com. No worries if you don’t have a blog – we can host posts for you here.

Submissions are due by August 1, but if you think you might take a little longer you can just shoot me a message to let me know and I can hold a spot for you :)

This month’s topic is “Asexual History”

For all that the asexual community is a young movement compared to communities like the LGBT community, we’ve developed a lot over the last decade and a half–and I’m still amazed that it’s really been that long. To put things in perspective, there are people on AVEN now who weren’t even born yet when the site was first created. But while we talk a lot about our speculation for the future of the community, there’s still very little formal conversation about our past. As such, for this carnival, I want to talk about our history – both how we remember our past and how we record our present for future aces. Some possible ideas for this topic include:

  • What events or trends do you see as the major highlights of asexual history?
  • What have been some of the highest and lowest points in asexual history, in your view?
  • What memories of your personal experiences with “asexual history” (whether it’s five years or five months ago) would you like to share with future aces?
  • What should we be doing (if anything) to record our history?
  • Why should we as a community care about asexual history? Why should non-asexual people care about asexual history?
  • Is it possible to speak of an “asexual history” before the development of self-identified asexual communities? If so, how should we approach that kind of history?
  • Is it appropriate to speculate about the a/sexuality of individuals who lived before asexuality and sexual orientations were a well-accepted concept?
  • They say that those who do not know history are doomed to repeat it – what lessons can we learn from ace communities past that are important for ace communities moving forward?
  • How can we prevent the loss of institutional memory as older members move on from our communities to other things?
  • How is asexual historiography affected by the fact that ace communities are largely internet based?
  • What unanswered questions do you have about asexual history that you would like to see addressed?
  • And, of course, anything else not on this list!
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About Sennkestra

I'm an aromantic asexual and a bit of an [a]sexuality nerd, recently graduated from UC Berkeley with a BA in linguistics. When I'm not reading stuff on the internet I like to cook fancy food, watch anime, and make costumes and other arts and crafts projects.
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33 Responses to July 2015 Carnival of Aces Call for Submissions: Asexual History

  1. Elizabeth says:

    Hahahaha, omg. We’ve gone back in time two years for the carnival on a month when the topic is asexual history. I love it!

  2. demiandproud says:

    Goodness! I’d love to participate but I’m not sure I can… Cool topic, though.

  3. Tristifere says:

    Reblogged this on Acing History and commented:
    Awesome topic for the Carnival of Aces. Hopefully, there will be a flood of interesting submissions.

  4. Pingback: Carnival of Aces: Dutch History? | Demisexual and Proud

  5. Pingback: June 2015 Carnival of Aces Round-Up: Mental Health | Prismatic Entanglements

  6. Pingback: Carnival of Aces: Mental Health | The Asexual Agenda

  7. Pingback: An online archaeology expedition: Keeping up with documenting the asexual community’s history | Cake at the Fortress

  8. I wrote one recently, before I knew about the carnival, if you want to “collect” it!

  9. Iris Robin says:

    Here is my submission; thank you for considering it. http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/blog/iris-robin/33709

  10. Pingback: Reminder: One Week Left for July Carnival of Aces Submissions on Asexual History! | Next Step: Cake

  11. Writer Ace says:

    Here are part one and part two of my response.

  12. It is very interesting topic for me, but now I’m planning event related to LGBT marriage, so I will write after the event.

  13. Pingback: Carnival of Aces: Begijnhof | Demisexual and Proud

  14. demiandproud says:

    So… I ended up writing this: https://demiandproud.wordpress.com/2015/07/25/carnival-of-aces-begijnhof/ I hope it’s an appropriate contribution.

  15. Pingback: Labeling historic people | Let Us Eat Cake

  16. Pingback: How to research asexual community history? A DYI guide | Acing History

  17. Pingback: Link Dump: Early Asexual Sites via Archive.org | Next Step: Cake

  18. Pingback: Early Ace History for Amateur Historians: Finding Primary Sources | Next Step: Cake

  19. Pingback: Blog Rants: The Early Ace Blogosphere | The Asexual Agenda

  20. Pingback: Blog Rants: The Early Ace Blogosphere | Prismatic Entanglements

  21. Elizabeth says:

    Here’s my submission! Sorry it’s late!

  22. Pingback: I Want to Have Sex Like… I’m Not Straight or Queer | Demisexual and Proud

  23. Pingback: Carnival of Aces July 2015 Wrap-up: Asexual History | Next Step: Cake

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